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ADA

Student Handbook

Welcome to Jefferson State Community College (JSCC) and the Americans with Disabilities Accommodations Office (ADA Office). The ADA Office staff looks forward to working with you and providing the assistance that will help make your academic career at JSCC more successful and satisfying.

  • Jefferson State Community College is committed to making its academic programs and services accessible to qualified students who have disabilities. It is a goal of Jefferson State Community College to provide students who have disabilities equal opportunities to develop and demonstrate their academic skills, while maintaining the academic integrity of the College programs. Consistent with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), and the American Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) it is the policy of Jefferson State Community College that no qualified person with a disability shall be subjected to discrimination because of that disability under any program or activity conducted or sponsored by the College.
  • Enrollment Services handles all applications for admission.  Admission standards are described in the Jefferson State catalog and must be met by all students, regardless of disability. Enrollment Services offers a series of orientation sessions for entering students.  Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the ADA Office before or during orientation. Students who need accommodations during orientation should contact the Enrollment Services Office upon receiving registration materials. The Enrollment Services Office can be reached at (205) 856-7704.
  • Colleges are not required to alter essential academic requirements.  Requirements, which can be demonstrated as essential to a course or program of study or to any directly related licensing requirement, are not regarded as discriminatory. Specifically, the law says  that a college “shall make such modifications to its academic requirements  as are necessary to ensure that such requirements do not discriminate or  have the effect of discriminating, on the basis of handicap, against a  qualified handicapped applicant or student… Modifications may include  changes in the length of time permitted for the completion of degree  requirements, substitution of specific courses required for the completion  of degree requirements, and adaptation of the manner in which specific  courses are conducted.” 34 CFR Section 1-04.44 (a).
  • When to self-identify as a student with a disability is a decision for the student.  However, prospective students are encouraged to contact the ADA Office for information regarding services and facilities and to discuss questions pertinent to admission. If accommodations are needed for placement testing, all documentation must be on file in the ADA Accommodation Office
  • The ADA Accommodations Office serves as the central contact point for students with disabilities.  The goal of the ADA Office is to provide a physically and educationally accessible College environment that ensures an individual is viewed on the basis of ability, not disability. The ADA Office works individually with students to determine appropriate and reasonable academic accommodations, and to have students’ academic performance evaluated without the limiting effects of a disability.

A Disability as Defined by the ADAAA

An individual who:

  • has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activity (caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks, talking, seeing, hearing, and learning).
  • has a record of such an impairment; or
  • is regarded as having such an impairment.

Adherence to the following procedures insures the best possible service the institution can provide.

The Director of the ADA Office meets individually with a student to discuss accommodations. The student completes a Student Request for ADA Accommodations Application and a Student Responsibility Form. The Director determines reasonable academic accommodation for a student, taking into consideration recommendations from the physician, psychologist or other professional who diagnosed the student’s disability. Accommodations previously used in educational settings with the student will be taken into consideration. Although some students may have similar diagnoses, each student is treated as an individual because accommodations must be tailored to individual needs.

The ADA Office recommends reasonable accommodations by preparing an Accommodation Letter addressed to the instructor of each class for which the student requests accommodations.

An instructor is not obliged to provide accommodations to a student with a disability until he/she receives the ADA Office accommodation letter from the student. In addition, it is the student’s responsibility to discuss scheduling and details of the requested accommodations with his/her instructor(s). If a student delivers an accommodation letter to an instructor within a few days of an assignment or exam, the instructor may not be able to provide the optimal accommodation requested.

Responsibility of the Student

Receiving academic accommodations at Jefferson State is a 4-step procedure:

  1. Students obtain accommodations letters from the ADA Office at the beginning of each semester. 
  2. Students deliver accommodation letters to each instructor discussing arrangements. 
  3. Students contact each instructor and the test proctor several days before accommodations such as extended test time and reduced-distraction testing to make arrangements as needed. 
  4. Students report any concerns about accommodations to the ADA Office as soon as possible.

Students with disabilities must maintain the same responsibility for their education as students who do not have disabilities. This includes maintaining the same academic levels, maintaining appropriate behavior and giving timely notification of any specific needs. As a student with a disability, learn not to be ashamed or embarrassed about having a disability. Asking for assistance is not a sign of weakness or dependence, and use accommodations available to you.

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504) and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) state that qualified students with disabilities who meet the technical and academic standards at Alabama College System institutions are entitled to reasonable accommodations. Under these laws a disability is defined as any physical or mental impairment which substantially limits a major life activity, a history of such impairment, or the perception of such impairment. Alabama College System institutions do NOT provide disability documentation for students. It is the student’s responsibility to provide appropriate documentation to the college office responsible for handling the request and to request accommodations.

Appropriate documentation is defined as that which meets the following criteria:

Health Condition, Mobility, Hearing, Speech, or Visual Impairment

A letter or report from treating physician, orthopedic specialist, audiologist, speech pathologist, or ophthalmologist (as appropriate), including:

  • Clearly stated diagnosis
  • Defined levels of functioning and any limitations**
  • Current treatment and medication
  • Current letter/report dated and signed

Psychological Disorder

A letter or report from a mental health professional (psychologist, neuropsychologist, psychiatrist, licensed professional counselor) including:

  • Clearly stated diagnosis (DSM-V criteria)
  • Defined levels of functioning and any limitations**
  • Supporting documentation (i e. test data, history, observation, etc.)
  • Current treatment and medication
  • Current letter/report dated and signed

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

A comprehensive evaluation report by a rehabilitation counselor, speech-language pathologist, orthopedic specialist, and/or nueropsychologist (or other specialist as appropriate), including:

  • Assessment of cognitive abilities, including processing speed and memory
  • Analysis of educational achievement skills and limitations (reading comprehension, written language, spelling, and mathematical abilities)
  • Defined levels of functioning and limitations in all affected areas** (communication, vision, hearing, mobility, psychological, seizures, etc.)
  • Current treatment and medication
  • Current letter/report (post-rehabilitation and preferably within 1 year), dated and signed

Learning Disability (LD)

A comprehensive psychological evaluation report from a clinical psychologist, psychiatrist, neuropsychologist, school psychologist, learning disability specialist, or diagnostician that should include:

  • Clear statement of presenting problem; diagnostic interview
  • Educational history documenting the impact of the learning disability
  • Alternative explanations and diagnoses are ruled out
  • Relevant test data with standard scores are provided to support conclusion, preferably including at least:​
    • WAIS- IV (b) WIAT-III or the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-III, including Written Language; and (c) Woodcock-Johnson Cognitive Processing Battery normed on adults to substantiate any processing problems
  • Clearly stated diagnosis of a learning disability based upon DSM-V criteria
  • Defined levels of functioning and any limitations, supported by evaluation data**
  • Current report (preferably within 5 years of enrollment date), dated and signed

Note: High School IEP, 504 Plan, and/or a letter from a physician or other professional are usually not sufficient to document a learning disability.

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

A comprehension psychological evaluation report from a physician, psychiatrist, clinical psychologist, neurologist, or nueropsychologist that should include:

  • Clear statement of presenting problem; diagnostic interview
  • Evidence of early and current impairment in at least two different environments (comprehensive history)
  • Alternative explanations and diagnoses are ruled out
  • Relevant test data with standard scores are provided to support conclusions, preferably including at least:​
    • WAIS- IV; (b) WIAT —III or the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-III, including Written Language; and (c) Behavioral Assessment Instruments for ADD/ADHD normed on adults
  • Clearly stated diagnosis of ADD or ADHD based upon DSM-V criteria
  • Defined levels of functioning and any limitations, supported by evaluation data**
  • Current report (preferably within 3 years of enrollment date), dated and signed

Note: High School IEP, 504 Plan, and/or letter from a physician or other professional are usually not sufficient to document ADD or ADHD. Medication cannot be used to imply a diagnosis.

Questions and concerns regarding accommodations and services for students who have a disability should be directed initially to the ADA Office.

At the beginning of each semester, students should give a copy of their Accommodation Letter to the instructor of each class where accommodations need to be made. Students and instructors will discuss the requested accommodations and sign the letter.  The student will then return the signed letter to the ADA Office and the instructor will keep a copy. If an agreement cannot be reached, the student should consult with the ADA Office for assistance.

Steps in Conflict Resolution

  • The ADA Director meets with the instructor, Department Chair or the Program Coordinator. A meeting of the student, the ADA Director, the instructor, Department Chair or the Program Coordinator may be required. If an agreement is not reached with the student, he or she may submit an appeal, in writing, to the Associate Dean/Dean within three (3) working days of the decision of the Department Chair or Program Coordinator.
  • The Associate Dean/Dean will review the student’s information, may conduct further investigation as needed, and will issue a decision to the student within five (5) working days of receipt of the appeal. If the student disagrees with the decision, the student may submit an appeal, in writing, to the Dean of Instruction.
  • The Dean of Instruction will review the student’s information, may conduct further investigation as needed, and will issue a written decision to the student within five (5) working days of receipt of the appeal. If the student disagrees with the decision, the student may submit an appeal, in writing to the President.
  • The President of the College will review the student’s information, may conduct further investigation as needed, and will issue a written decision to the student within five (5) working days of receipt of the appeal.

The College will make every reasonable effort to address a student’s concerns promptly to minimize the effect on course participation.

During the conflict resolution process, the student is entitled to receive all accommodations recommended by the ADA Accommodations Office.  It is important that concerns are addressed promptly so that the student’s participation in courses is not affected.

The procedures above refer only to resolving conflicts regarding ADA accommodations.  For information regarding other forms of complaints and/or appeals, please refer to the college's Complaint/Appeal Process.

Area High School College
Applicable Laws
I.D.E.A (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973
 
Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Title 11) ADAAA (American with Disabilities Act Amendment Act of 2008)
I.D.E.A (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973
 
Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Title 11) ADAAA (American with Disabilities Act Amendment Act of 2008)
Required Documentation I.E.P. (Individual Education Plan); 504 Plan;School provides evaluation at no cost to student.  School conducts evaluations at prescribed intervals Varies depending on the disability; high school I.E.P. and 504 are not sufficient; must include the testing on which the accommodations are based. Student must get evaluation at own expense and student must provide approved documentation, no more than three (3) years old.
Identification of Disability Student is identified by the school and is supported by parents and teachers.  Primary responsibility for arranging accommodations belongs to the school Student must self-identify to the office responsible for Disability Services.  Primary responsibility for self advocacy and arranging accommodations belongs to the student
Parental Role Parent has access to student records and can participate in the accommodation process. Parent advocates for the student. Parent does not have access to student records without student’s written consent; student must initiate and complete.  Student advocates for self and must have frequent contact with their counselor.
Instruction Teachers may modify curriculum and/or alter pace of assignments.  Frequent use of multi-sensory tools. Weekly testing, mid-term, final, and graded assignments and homework.  Attendance taken and reported Professors are not required to modify curriculum design.  Tends to be lecture style; may or may not use multi-sensory approach; labs required for some courses.  Testing and assignment frequency varies.  Attendance is taken and absences are limited to a specific number of hours; if you exceed this number of hours, you may receive a lower grade.
Grades and Test Grades may be modified based on curriculum. Grades reflect the quality of work submitted; student must request testing accommodations at the beginning of the semester.
Transportation School provides transportation at no cost. Student must arrange transportation.  Special transportation service is available through the City of Birmingham.
Conduct Disruptive conduct may be accepted. Disruptive behavior and inability to abide by the institution’s code of conduct are deemed “not qualified” and can be dismissed.
Most Important Difference I.D.E.A. is about Success.  High School is mandatory and free. A.D.A. is about Equal Access.  Postsecondary is voluntary and the student is responsible for the cost.

ADAPTIVE EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE

For students who qualify the following equipment/services are available:

ADA Accommodations Office

  • PlexTalk DAISY Players are available to download and play audio textbooks from the Library of Congress and Learning Ally
  • Audio Text Books (restrictions apply)
  • E-Text or PDF versions of textbooks (restrictions apply)
  • Calculators
  • Alpha Smart Keyboards
  • Stationary and Portable CCTV (screen print enlarger)
  • Screen Readers
  • Scanners
  • FM Systems
  • Sign Language Interpreters and/or CART Services
  • Large print single copies of syllabi, tests, brief readings and handouts
  • Carbonless note taker paper
  • Readers/Scribes/Note Takers
  • Assistance with note taking and written exams can be made for students who qualify.
  • Computer Software:  ZoomText, NVAccess, Text Aloud, JAWS, Kurzweil, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Scientific Notebook

Computer Adaptive Devices - Jefferson Campus

Learning Success Center

  • 2 Stand Alone Units

Learning Resource Center-

  • CCTV

Computer Adaptive Devices - Shelby Campus

Learning Success Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit

Learning Resource Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit
  • CCTV

Computer Adaptive Devices - Pell City Campus

Learning Success Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit

Learning Resource Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit

Computer Adaptive Devices - Clanton Campus

Learning Success Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit

Learning Resource Center

  • 1 Stand Alone Unit

TTY/TDD

  • ADA Accommodations Office at Jefferson Campus - FSC 300
  • ADA Accommodations Office at Shelby Campus - GSB 106
  • An individual who is deaf or hearing impaired can communicate by telephone if the other party also has a TTY or TDD. E-Mail the ADA Accommodations Office at:  ada@jeffersonstate.edu 

**The College is not required to provide services of a personal nature, including assistance with eating, toileting, or mobility.

Personal Care Assistant Policy

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as amended in 2008 (ADA/ADAAA), Jefferson State Community College recognizes that Personal Care Attendants (PCAs) may be necessary to address the personal needs of a student with a disability for that student to fully participate at the College. Students who require personal care attendant services who wish to have the same independent experience as all other college students are encouraged to hire an impartial PCA. Students who require such services must contact and register with Jefferson State’s ADA Accommodations Office.  Jefferson State is committed to reviewing all requests for reasonable accommodations on a case-by-case basis.

The College does not provide personal care assistants to assist with eating, toileting, or dressing, nor does it assume coordination or financial responsibilities for personal attendant services.  An otherwise qualified student with a disability who requires personal attendant services is responsible for making arrangements to provide for his/her own personal care attendant service.   Individuals who serve as a personal care assistant must abide by Jefferson State’s Code of Student Conduct.

Definitions

  • Student with a Disability: A student with a disability is identified as an individual who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, as specified according to the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act (2008).
  • Personal Care Attendant (PCA): A personal care attendant is a person hired by a student with a disability to perform activities of daily living duties in Jefferson State sponsored classrooms, programs, and activities.

Audio Taping of Class Lecture Agreement

The ADA Office, where appropriate, and subject to the approval of the Dean of the student’s School or College, may recommend that a student with a qualifying disability be permitted to audiotape class lectures as a form of academic accommodation.  Use of the accommodation of audio taping class lectures is subject to the following conditions:

  • Audiotape of class lectures are only for the student’s personal use in study and preparation related to the class.
  • The student may not share these audiotapes with any other person, whether or not that person is in his/her class.
  • The student acknowledges that the audiotapes are sources, the use of which in any academic work is governed by rules of academic conduct for his/her School or College.
  • The student agrees to destroy any audiotapes that were made when they are no longer needed for his/her academic work.

Students who have been granted permission to audiotape class lectures as an accommodation must agree in writing to abide by each of these provisions. [A printable PDF is provided below.]

STUDENTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO SIGN THE FOLLOWING AGREEMENT REGARDING AUDIOTAPING OF CLASS LECTURES:

The ADA Office has recommended that I, _____________________________________, be permitted to audio tape certain class lectures as a form of academic accommodation.  As a condition of using the accommodation of audio taping class lectures, I hereby agree to the following:

  • I will use audiotapes of class lectures solely for my personal use in study and preparation related to the class.
  • I will not share these audiotapes with any other person, whether or not that person is in my class.
  • I acknowledge that the audiotapes are sources, the use of which in any academic work is governed by rules of academic conduct for my School or College.
  • I agree to destroy any audiotapes that I was permitted to make when they are no longer needed for my academic work.
  • I understand that failure to abide by these provisions may result in loss of permission to audiotape class lectures.

 

_________________________________________          _________________________

Student’s Signature                                                                     Date

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